Monoethylene Glycol Recovery

Monoethylene glycol (MEG)

Monoethylene glycol (MEG) injection is one of the most commonly used methods for hydrate inhibition in production pipelines. MEG is an expensive material and needs to be recovered effectively to minimise the on-going costs associated with MEG replacement and environmental costs associated with disposal. Strata was approached by Cameron Process Systems firstly to design and subsequently to fabricate and install a pilot plant to enable the key parts of their PureMEG® reclamation and regeneration process to be evaluated and improved.

The nature of the separation techniques employed in the PureMEG® process dictated the minimum dimensions of the main separating section to ensure that experimental results would reliably translate to the full scale design.  This in turn set the scale of all the peripheral components resulting in a pilot plant footprint of 6m by 4m and a maximum height of 10.5m.

Following completion of the outline design Cameron Process Systems went out to the University Sector to choose a partner to host and operate the research facility.  They selected the University of Manchester whose existing pilot plant facility was scheduled to be replaced with a new state of the art facility in the middle of the planned experimental program.

Strata made extensive use of 3D modelling techniques during the detailed design phase to design the rig in practically sized compact modules that could both be installed in the upper floors of the Morton Laboratory for the initial period of operation and subsequently disconnected and be reassembled in the new James Chadwick pilot plant facility.

Strata delivered a state-of-the-art PureMEG® pilot plant which has enabled the key steps in the process to be studied at a realistic scale.  Following on from the successful start-up Strata has provided on-going support in the design and installation of additional equipment and modules to enhance the range of process steps that can be studied in detail using this facility.

It has also enabled Cameron Process Systems, with the support of the University of Manchester, to demonstrate their process to the wider Exploration and Production community in support of increasing the deployment of PureMEG® units within oil production facilities.

The project has opened up the oil and gas sector to my multiphase processing research group, initiating numerous research projects. Every year hundreds of undergraduates now benefit from using the processes in our state-of-the-art facilities.

Dr. Peter Martin,
School of Chemical Engineering
& Analytical Science,

The University of Manchester

More detail about the PureMEG® pilot plant.

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